Friday, July 25

Surf Wise.

Maybe it's my Southern California upbringing, but I am so intrigued to see this film, Surf Wise. I've heard the crazy stories of Dorian “Doc” Paskowitz for years, but didn't know a lot of about his adventures with his family, including nine children and his wife, as they traveled the world together as surf nomads in a 24 foot camper.

Surf Wise chronicles Dr. Paskowitz's surfing adventures across the country. Abandoning a successful medical practice, Doc sought self-fulfillment by taking up the nomadic life of a surfer. Together, he and his family lived a life that would be unfathomable to most, but enviable to anyone who ever relinquished their dreams to a nine to five job. Almost evangelical, Doc refused to allow his children to attend school, and instead search for the pursuit of happiness, personal meaning and perfect waves. You can find local theater play dates for Surf Wise here.


14 comments:

Aesthetic Outburst... said...

I'd love to see this too! I heard an interview on NPR with some of his children and it was really interesting.

mstrex said...

I watched this recently. The film isn't shot very well but still the story is very interesting and compelling.

Missa said...

I just recently saw this, very interesting life they led! Interesting in that it seemed to be both utterly idyllic and totally messed up all at the same time.

I've got to say though, having one 9-month old baby, I can't even imagine raising 9 kids in that camper! ;)

Anonymous said...

I watched it at the Lido in Newport Beach. As a mother and a surfer, found myself thinking about it for days afterwards. The WSJ reviewer who wrote it's more a study of narcasism than surfing was spot on.

sfgirlbybay said...

I can't wait to see it!

And Anon - ah, the Lido!! You're making me crave a Balboa Bar and dinner at the Crab Cooker. I spent many a summer in Newport!

Molly said...

I love the philosophy behind this. To REFUSE to let your children go to school! No jobs, just living! This is so great. It reminds me that every minute that goes by, you never get back, so you better be loving what you do.

m e l i g r o s a said...

yes (with aesth.o.) terry gross did a great intervoew with one of the kids. the whole story of it all around is just quite fascinating.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=90272530

HappyHibiscus said...

I grew up with seven kids in my family, and I just had my first, I need to see this movie and spice up the childrearing a bit! :)

Jo Bradford said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Fiona said...

Yeah, but wasn't the catch that he was abusive, and the kids really didn't get an education? Not to be a downer or anything, but that's what I remember reading. Except for that part, it sounds great!

sfgirlbybay said...

Fiona,

I think you are correct that he was quite dogmatic. I think some of the kids liked the lifestyle, others were left with a bad taste about it. Part of what makes it interesting, perhaps.

jenny said...

I saw this in Atlanta a few weeks ago. I'd never heard about him or his family, but I loved the film. It was interesting to see how some of the [now adult] children look back on the situation today. From a graphic designer's perspective, I also loved the opening titles.

I've recommended this film to my friends, and I'll definitely see it again!

Anonymous said...

where is the mom?

sfgirlbybay said...

Mom is there, too! ;)